A fountain featuring Atlas supporting the world on his shoulders.

NSF proposals to require new current and pending support format beginning June 1

Columns and arches in Union Station.

National Science Foundation’s latest Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) has been released and takes effect for proposals submitted on or after June 1. One of the more notable changes in the new guide is a requirement for information about current and pending support (CPS). CPS information is used by reviewers to assess the “capacity of the individual to carry out the research as well as to help assess any potential overlap/duplication with the project being proposed.”

The new PAPPG includes a requirement that CPS information be submitted in an NSF-approved format. The two approved methods for generating CPS information in an approved format are through SciENcv and through a fillable-form PDF. Both of these options are still in development, with no definite word on when we’ll be able to take a look.

NSF has released an FAQ document on the topic, which explains that CPS information formatted in ways other than the two approved methods will not be accepted. In fact, submitting a CPS PDF prepared in any other way will generate an error message.

Most of the remaining FAQs focus on the content of the current and pending information, rather than the format. I’ve summarized some of the most relevant information here:

  • Gifts should not be reported in CPS. However, an item or service given with an expectation of a time commitment from a researcher is not considered a gift; it’s an in-kind contribution. Ask your Research & Sponsored Programs representative if you need help determining whether something is a gift or an in-kind contribution.
  • In-kind contributions with an associated time commitment should be included in CPS (even if the contribution is not to be used on the proposed project).
  • Start-up packages should not be included in CPS.

Federal funders are increasingly concerned with accurate reporting of CPS information. Falsely reported information can be a serious matter. If you have any questions on what should be reported, please contact your Research & Sponsored Programs representative.


Written by Amy Hurley Cooper, Associate Director of Proposal Development, Office of Research & Innovation, Miami University.

Photo of Atlas fountain by Pauline E via geograph.org.uk. Photo of columns and arches by takomabibelot via Flickr. Both used under Creative Commons license.

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