A pile of cards, all of which have "change" written on them.

Welcome to our redesign

If you’re a subscriber or a regular reader, you might have found yourself doing a quick double-check of the address bar when you saw this post because it didn’t look like what you were used to!

As promised in an earlier post about changes in our office, we’ve updated our blog template. The new look is a little cleaner, and we’ve reduced the number of post categories. Together, these changes make our content easier to find and easier to read.

Take a look around and use the comments to let us know what you think!


Image by geralt via Pixabay, used under Creative Commons license.

A microphone in a studio.

Podcasts can help pass the social distancing time

An iPhone with earbuds next to a notebook and a pen.

Sure, remote instruction probably means you’re spending more time teaching, rather than less. And when you’re doing it from home, work has a way of expanding to fit the available time — especially if you’re trying to do it while also caring for children who are home from school or daycare. Still, as the coronavirus pandemic — and the requisite social distancing — stretches on, you’ll probably find yourself looking for ways to pass your time at home, and podcasts can fit the bill. Whether you’re new to the podcast renaissance or a devoted listener, you might want to give a listen to some of the following.

Miami podcasts

  • Major Insight showcases Miami students and how they transform academic subjects into lifelong passions.
  • Reframe, the original podcast from the College of Education, Health and Society (EHS), explores the transformative and progressive work being done across the university and throughout the community. Hear insightful interviews and exclusive stories about the faculty, students, and alumni who are addressing some of the most critical issues of our time.

Miami faculty podcasts

  • Chiropractic Science, hosted by associate clinical professor Dr. Dean Smith, gets the word out about chiropractic research. Chiropractors, patients and the public will learn about chiropractic science from the experts who are doing the research.
  • Stats and Stories, hosted by university distinguished professor John Bailer; professor emeritus Richard Campbell; and assistant professor Rosemary Pennington, uses stories to give statistics meaning and statistics to give stories credibility.

Other podcasts (recommendations via H-Net)

  • Backstory with the American History Guys is a public radio show and podcast hosted by U.S. historians Ed Ayers, Peter Onuf, and Brian Balogh, who give historical perspective to topics in the headlines.
  • Cold Call distills the Harvard Business School’s legendary case studies into podcast form. Hosted by Brian Kenny, the podcast airs every two weeks and features HBS faculty discussing cases they’ve written and the lessons they impart.
  • Everything Hertz goes everywhere the life sciences meet the biological sciences A bi-weekly conversation-style podcast with Dan Quintana and Dr. James Heathers, Everything Hertz explores the nuts and bolts of scientific research and academic life issues, like writing and publishing, the PhD to postdoc transition, and work-life balance.
  • In the Harvard Medical Labcast, Harvard Medical School scientists tackle a variety of important questions, ranging from how your neurons work to which genes play a role in particular diseases. This podcast provides context and highlights the latest trends in medical education and biomedical research through interviews and analysis.
  • Sidedoor is a podcast from the Smithsonian, produced and hosted by Tony Cohn and Megan Detrie. It tells stories about science, art, history, humanity and where they unexpectedly overlap.
  • Talking Machines is a podcast about the world of machine learning. Producer Katherine Gorman and Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Associate Ryan Adams speak with experts in the field about the latest research. Talking Machines is an independent production of Tote Bag Productions.

Microphone photo by Stock snap via Pixabay. iPhone photo via PeakPX. Both used under Creative Commons license.

Graphic of digital 1's and 0's on a high-tech looking background.

Data management plan resources are available

Screenshot of DMPTool.org. Links at top of page: Learn. Sign In. Title: DMPTool: Build your Data Management Plan. Ribbon: Welcome. Create data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements. Get started [button]. Below image: DMPTool by the numbers: 28,787 users; 25,051 Plans [More link]; 229 Participating Institutions [More link]. Top 5 templates: NSF-SBE Social, Behavioral, Economic Sciences; DMP Template from DCC; Department of Energy (DOE): Office of Science; Digital Curation Centre; NIH-GEN: Generic. DMPTTool News: New DMPTool launched today [link]. Go to blog. Rss feed icon [link]. Links: About; Terms of use & Privact; Accessibility; GitHub; Contact us. Twitter and RSS feed icon links. Footer: DMPTool logo. DMPTool is a service of the University of California Curation Center of the California Digital Library. Copyright 2010-2018 The Regents of the University of California.

For some time, the NSF has required data management plans, and now the NIH has released a draft policy on making data sets used in NIH-funded research available to other researchers. (Read more about the new NIH policy from ScienceMag.org.)

Thankfully, resources for managing data are available to Miami faculty:

  • DMPTool.org allows you to create, review, and share data management plans that meet institutional and funder requirements.
  • Staff in the Center for Digital Scholarship are available for personalized reviews of data management plans prior to proposal submission.

To get started with DMPTool. org:

  • Navigate to DMPTool.org.
  • Click the big Get Started button in the middle of the screen.
  • Select Miami University (OH) from the drop-down list of institutions on the next page.
  • Click the green Next button.
  • Enter your Miami unique ID and password on the MUNet Login Page.
  • On the next page, click the green Create New DMP button and follow the prompts.

For questions about using DMPTool.org or to arrange a personalized review of your data management plan, contact Eric Johnson, Numeric and Spatial Data Librarian, Center for Digital Scholarship, King Library (513-529-4152).


Data image by By DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, via Wikimedia Commons, public domain.

 

Faculty converse at Research & Innovation's 10th Annual Proposals & Awards Reception.

Neither snow, nor rain, nor gloom of night stayed Miamians from the 10th Annual Proposals and Awards Reception

Biology’s Mike Robinson (left) chats with Scripps Gerontology Center’s Kate de Medeiros at Research & Innovation’s 10th Annual Proposals & Awards Reception.

It’s become something of a tradition for the weather to be less-than-ideal on the date of Research & Innovation’s Proposals & Awards Reception, and this year was no exception. Despite having experienced a very mild winter overall, the afternoon of February 12 began rainy and ended slushy and slippery. Still, close to 60 intrepid PIs, chairs, deans, and support personnel braved the elements to join Research & Innovation staff for drinks and appetizers in King Library’s AIS. In addition to temporary refuge from the increasingly solid precipitation, each attendee received a spiral notebook with an assortment of sticky notes and flags as a token of thanks from Research & Innovation.


Photos by Research & Innovation.

Round, metal perpetual calendar. Text: Place Year Over Month. For 55 Yrs. Calendar. 1970-2024. Red Month for Leap Year. Th F S S M Tu W. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30

Deadlines and events coming up in March

Two pages from a spiral bound calendar, each partially visible. Text: 6 W. 7 T. 8 FR. 9 SA. 7 8 9 10 11. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16.

Be sure to check out the deadlines and events coming up next month:

March 10 . . . . . . . . . .  Informal research networking at Cru Gastro Lounge
March 11
. . . . . . . . . .  Human subjects/IRB application training
March 27 . . . . . . . . . .  Free NEH writing workshop and consultations at Ohio University


Perpetual calendar photo by Bryan Kennedy via Flickr. Paper calendar photo by photosteve101 via Flickr. Both used under Creative Commons license

Round, metal perpetual calendar. Text: Place Year Over Month. For 55 Yrs. Calendar. 1970-2024. Red Month for Leap Year. Th F S S M Tu W. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30

Deadlines and events coming up in February

Two pages from a spiral bound calendar, each partially visible. Text: 6 W. 7 T. 8 FR. 9 SA. 7 8 9 10 11. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16.

Be sure to check out the deadlines and events coming up next month:

February 3 . . . . . . . . . .  Human subjects/IRB application training
February 4
. . . . . . . . . .  Human subjects/IRB application training
February 7
. . . . . . . . . .  Human subjects/IRB application training
February 11 . . . . . . . . . Human subjects/IRB application training
February 12 . . . . . . . . . Proposals & Awards Reception
February 17 . . . . . . . . . Presidents’ Day: Federal agencies are closed; Research & Innovation is open
February 20 . . . . . . . . . Human subjects/IRB application training
February 24 . . . . . . . . . Human subjects/IRB application training
February 25
. . . . . . . . .  Animal Care Program orientation


Perpetual calendar photo by Bryan Kennedy via Flickr. Paper calendar photo by photosteve101 via Flickr. Both used under Creative Commons license

Boy waving goodbye.

Out with the OARS and in with the new

Neon sign reads "NEW"

As previously announced, the Office for the Advancement of Research & Scholarship is no more. We are currently in the process of updating our communications channels to reflect our new name: the Office of Research & Innovation.

In fact, you may have noticed some changes here in this very blog. The blog is now known as the Research & Innovation Report and it has a new URL: MiamiOHResearch.org. If you’re a subscriber, you don’t need to do anything to keep seeing posts in your inbox. And if you’ve bookmarked us, no need to worry about updating the link because the old URL redirects to the new one. But, if you tell anyone about us — and we hope you will! — it would probably be good to send them to the new URL.  (And a heads-up that we will be redesigning the blog, so look for a fresh new appearance in the coming weeks.)

We’ve also updated our Twitter handle and created a new Facebook page.

If you already follow us on Twitter, thank you; there’s no need to do anything to keep seeing our tweets in your feed. You’ll just see they come from MiamiOH_ResInno, rather than MiamiOH_OARS. If you don’t already follow us but want to, or if you need to update a bookmark or want to invite a friend to follow us, you can find us at twitter.com/MiamiOH_ResInno.

Whether you followed OARS’ old Facebook page (which will no longer be supported) or would like to connect with us for the first time, we encourage you to like our new page at facebook.com/MiamiOH.ResearchInnovation.

We look forward to seeing you around!


Neon sign image by mstlion via Pixabay. Wave goodbye image by mohamed_hassan via Pixabay. Both used under Creative Commons license.