Undergraduate Research Award (URA) applications due October 5

For over three decades, the Miami University Senate has sponsored the URA to provide Miami undergraduates with a faculty-mentored experience in developing grant applications. The goal of these partnerships is to encourage discovery and stimulate creative activity.

New this year are two special sub-categories:

  • DEI Diversity, Equity and Inclusion — In keeping with broader university-wide diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, a portion of available funds will be reserved for research, scholarship, or creative activities in the areas of social justice, human rights, diversity, equity and inclusion.
  • IDEA (Interdisciplinary Engagement Award) — This award category provides a student team an opportunity to collaborate with at least one faculty mentor across student team members’ disciplinary boundaries. The award can be used to address a research question and intentionally apply knowledge from different fields.

Students with any major can apply for URA awards. Both individual and team projects are eligible. In 2019-2020, 26 of 46 URAs went to student teams.

Typical awards range from $150 to $500, but individual projects of exceptional merit or projects involving student teams may receive up to $1,000. A faculty sponsor must certify that an individual or team project is worth doing, has educational value to the student(s) and can be accomplished in the proposed time frame. The aim and result of proposed projects may be modest as long as the work can reasonably be interpreted as research or a creative endeavor. The faculty sponsor must also ensure that the proposed research complies with university guidelines for conducting research during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Applications for Spring 2021 projects are due October 5, 2020.  Full program guidelines and application instructions are available on the ORU website.


Photo by Miami University Photo Services.

Student Selina Davis works on a drawing while her faculty sponsor, Associate Professor of Art Joomi Chung, looks on.

Undergraduate Research Award (URA) applications due March 2

Miami’s Office of Research for Undergraduates provides funding for undergraduate research, like that done by Isabel Held (left) under the mentorship of associate professor of psychology Jennifer Quinn (right).

For over three decades, the Miami University Senate has sponsored the URA to provide Miami undergraduates with a faculty-mentored experience in developing grant applications. The goal of these partnerships is to encourage discovery and stimulate creative activity.

Students with any major can apply for these awards, as long as they have an existing research experience with a faculty mentor. Both individual and team projects are eligible. In 2018-2019, 26 of 49 URAs went to student teams.

Typical awards range from $150 to $500, but individual projects of exceptional merit or projects involving student teams may receive up to $1,000. A faculty sponsor must certify that an individual or team project is worth doing, has educational value to the student(s) and can be accomplished in the proposed time frame. The aim and result of proposed projects may be modest as long as the work can reasonably be interpreted as research or a creative endeavor.

Applications for Fall 2020 projects are due March 2, 2020.  Full program guidelines and application instructions are available here.


Updated February 11 to correct deadline in headline. The original headline listed a deadline of October 14. The correct deadline for projects for Fall 2020 is March 2.

Photo of Isabel Held and Associate Professor Jennifer Quinn by Scott Kissell, Miami University Photo Services. Photo of Selina Davis and Associate Professor Joomi Chung by Ricardo Trevino, Miami University Photo Services.

Student Selina Davis works on a drawing while her faculty sponsor, Associate Professor of Art Joomi Chung, looks on.

Undergraduate Research Award (URA) applications due October 14

Miami’s Office of Research for Undergraduates provides funding for undergraduate research, like that done by Isabel Held (left) under the mentorship of associate professor of psychology Jennifer Quinn (right).

For over three decades, the Miami University Senate has sponsored the URA to provide Miami undergraduates with a faculty-mentored experience in developing grant applications. The goal of these partnerships is to encourage discovery and stimulate creative activity.

Students with any major can apply for these awards, as long as they have an existing research experience with a faculty mentor. Both individual and team projects are eligible. In 2018-2019, 26 of 49 URAs went to student teams.

Typical awards range from $150 to $500, but individual projects of exceptional merit or projects involving student teams may receive up to $1,000. A faculty sponsor must certify that an individual or team project is worth doing, has educational value to the student(s) and can be accomplished in the proposed time frame. The aim and result of proposed projects may be modest as long as the work can reasonably be interpreted as research or a creative endeavor.

Applications for Spring 2020 projects are due October 14, 2019.  Full program guidelines and application instructions are available here.


Photo of Isabel Held and Associate Professor Jennifer Quinn by Scott Kissell, Miami University Photo Services. Photo of Selina Davis and Associate Professor Joomi Chung by Ricardo Trevina, Miami University Photo Services.

Undergraduate Research Award (URA) applications due March 4

A young woman wearing a white lab coat and bright blue surgical gloves inserts a pipette into a test tube she is holding in her left hand. Her mentor, a woman who wears a white lab coat and glasses, looks on. The younger woman is seated at a counter cluttered with machinery and supplies. In the background is a bulletin board covered with paper and sticky notes.
Miami’s Office of Research for Undergraduates provides funding for undergraduate research, like that done by Rachel Mann (left) under the mentorship of associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry Carole Dabney Smith (right).

For over three decades, the Miami University Senate has sponsored the URA to provide Miami undergraduates with a faculty-mentored experience in developing grant applications. These partnerships are meant to encourage discovery and stimulate creative activity.  Students may submit individual projects or team projects. Typical awards range from $150 to $500, but individual projects of exceptional merit or projects involving student teams may be funded up to $1,000. Each individual or team project must be endorsed by a sponsor who certifies that the project is worth doing, has educational value to the student(s) and can be accomplished in the proposed time frame. The aim and result of specific projects supported by the program may be modest as long as the work can reasonably be interpreted as research or a creative endeavor.

Applications for summer session or Fall 2019 projects are due March 4, 2019.  Full program guidelines and application instructions are available here.


Photos by Scott Kissell, Miami University Photo Services.

Undergraduate Research Award (URA) applications due March 5

A young woman wearing a white lab coat and bright blue surgical gloves inserts a pipette into a test tube she is holding in her left hand. Her mentor, a woman who wears a white lab coat and glasses, looks on. The younger woman is seated at a counter cluttered with machinery and supplies. In the background is a bulletin board covered with paper and sticky notes.
Miami’s Office of Research for Undergraduates provides funding for undergraduate research, like that done by Rachel Mann (left) under the mentorship of associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry Carole Dabney Smith (right).

For over three decades, the Miami University Senate has sponsored the URA to provide Miami undergraduates with a faculty-mentored experience in developing grant applications. These partnerships are meant to encourage discovery and stimulate creative activity.  Students may submit individual projects or team projects. Typical awards range from $150 to $500, but individual projects of exceptional merit or projects involving student teams may be funded up to $1,000. Each individual or team project must be endorsed by a sponsor who certifies that the project is worth doing, has educational value to the student(s) and can be accomplished in the proposed time frame. The aim and result of specific projects supported by the program may be modest as long as the work can reasonably be interpreted as research or a creative endeavor.

Applications for summer session or Fall 2018 projects are due March 5, 2018.  Full program guidelines and application instructions are available here.


Photos by Scott Kissell, Miami University Photo Services.

Undergraduate Research Award (URA) applications due March 6

A young woman wearing a white lab coat and bright blue surgical gloves inserts a pipette into a test tube she is holding in her left hand. Her mentor, a woman who wears a white lab coat and glasses, looks on. The younger woman is seated at a counter cluttered with machinery and supplies. In the background is a bulletin board covered with paper and sticky notes.
Miami’s Office of Research for Undergraduates provides funding for undergraduate research, like that done by Rachel Mann (left) under the mentorship of associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry Carole Dabney Smith (right).

For over three decades, the Miami University Senate has sponsored the URA to provide Miami undergraduates with a faculty-mentored experience in developing grant applications. These partnerships are meant to encourage discovery and stimulate creative activity.  Students may submit individual projects or team projects. Typical awards range from $150 to $500, but individual projects of exceptional merit or projects involving student teams may be funded up to $1,000. Each individual or team project must be endorsed by a sponsor who certifies that the project is worth doing, has educational value to the student(s) and can be accomplished in the proposed time frame. The aim and result of specific projects supported by the program may be modest as long as the work can reasonably be interpreted as research or a creative endeavor.

Applications for summer session or Fall 2017 projects are due March 6, 2017.  Full program guidelines and application instructions are available here.


Photos by Scott Kissell, Miami University Photo Services.

Reduction gears on Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6 gas turbine engine.

NSF GOALI program helps academics engage with industry

Jigsaw Puzzle hand cut by Charles W. Hamm featuring "Sortie de l'Opéra en l'an 2000" by Albert Robida. Here the earlet shape used by many puzzle cutters to lock pieces together can be seen.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports collaborations between academic institutions and industry in order to improve capacity for intellectual and economic growth.

Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) is a mechanism that supports hands-on experiences for undergraduate students, graduate students, postdocs, and faculty in industrial settings through fellowships. Additionally the mechanism supports university-industry partnerships on long-term projects, both research and educational.

Projects supported by GOALI are intended to address the linkages between products and processes. Project terms may vary from months to multiple years.

A number of NSF Directorates offer the GOALI mechanism as an addition to current standing programs or as supplements to existing NSF awards. It is important that proposers review GOALI information specific to their directorate/program and talk with a program officer prior to applying.

GOALI is one of the few NSF programs that requires cost sharing — typically by the industrial partner.

For more information on the GOALI program, read the most recent GOALI “Dear Colleague” letter (NSF 16-009) .


Written by Tricia Callahan, Director of Proposal Development, Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship, Miami University.

Gear image by Sparkignitor via Wikimedia Commons. Puzzle photo by Charles Hamm via Wikimedia Commons. Both used under Creative Commons license.

Undergraduate Research Award (URA) applications due March 2

A young woman wearing a white lab coat and bright blue surgical gloves inserts a pipette into a test tube she is holding in her left hand. Her mentor, a woman who wears a white lab coat and glasses, looks on. The younger woman is seated at a counter cluttered with machinery and supplies. In the background is a bulletin board covered with paper and sticky notes.
Miami’s Office of Research for Undergraduates provides funding for undergraduate research, like that done by Rachel Mann (left) under the mentorship of associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry Carole Dabney Smith (right).

For over three decades, the Miami University Senate has sponsored the URA to provide Miami undergraduates with a faculty-mentored experience in developing grant applications. These partnerships are meant to encourage discovery and stimulate creative activity.  Students may submit individual projects or team projects. Typical awards range from $150 to $500, but individual projects of exceptional merit or projects involving student teams may be funded up to $1,000. Each individual or team project must be endorsed by a sponsor who certifies that the project is worth doing, has educational value to the student(s) and can be accomplished in the proposed time frame. The aim and result of specific projects supported by the program may be modest as long as the work can reasonably be interpreted as research or a creative endeavor.

Applications for Fall 2015 projects are due March 2, 2015.  Full program guidelines and application instructions are available here.

Photos by Scott Kissell, Miami University Photo Services.