Two children play kick the can

Required use of SAM.gov UEIs postponed

For those of you keeping track, we wanted to let you know that the federal government has postponed the deadline for transitioning away from DUNS numbers. The federal government was supposed to begin using their own unique identifiers for entities registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) by the end of this year, but are now targeting April 2022.

There’s nothing Miami PIs need to do at this time. Whenever Miami is assigned its UEI, we will update the institutional codes and identifiers section of our “Budget Resources” webpage and make the necessary changes to our institutional profile in Cayuse. Proposal consultants will also work with their assigned PIs to ensure the correct data is entered into applications prior to submission, both before and after the UEI rollout.


Kick the can image by Gan Khoon Lay from the Noun Project, used under Creative Commons license.

A collection of chicken eggs, each stamped with an identifier

ORCID identifiers help researchers distinguish themselves

Screen shot of ORCID homepage. Text: ORCID. Connecting Research and Researchers. (Tabs:) For Researchers, For Organizations, About, Help, Sign In. (Main text:) Distinguish yourself in three easy steps. ORCID provides persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized. Find out more. 1. Register. Get your unique ORCID identifier Register now! Registration takes 30 seconds. 2. Add your info. Enhance your ORCID record with your professional information and link to your other identifiers (such as Scopus or ResearcherID or LinkedIn). 3. Use your ORCID ID. Include your ORCID identifier on your Webpage, when you submit publications, apply for grants, and in any research workflow to ensure you get credit for your work. Members make ORCID Possible! ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by a global community of organizational members, including research organizations, publishers, funders, professional associations, and other stakeholders in the research ecosystem. Curious about who our members are? See our complete list of member organizations. (Sidebar:) Latest News. Fri, 2016-09-23 Peer Review Week - The Video! Thu, 2016-09-22. #RecognitionReview with ORCID. Tue, 2016-0-20 Recognition for Review: Who's Doing What? Mon, 2016-09-12. Meet the Lens: Integrating ORCID IDs into patents. Mon, 2016-08-29. PIDapalooza - What, Why, When, Who? More news.
ORCID is an organization that assigns researchers unique identifiers.

You may recall a 2015 paper on the Higgs boson published in Physical Review Letters that boasted a record-breaking 5,154 authors. Twenty-three of those authors had the last name Wang, two each with the first initials C, F, H, and Q, and four with the first initial J.

What this example of “hyperauthorship” make clear is that there can be multiple researchers with similar, if not identical, names in the same field. That can make things difficult for researchers, funders, and publishers alike.

To help resolve this issue, a number of organizations have begun issuing unique identifiers researchers can use to distinguish themselves from others with the same or similar names, thereby protecting their scholarly identities.

One of the most popular of these organizations is ORCID. ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by research organizations, publishers, funders, and professional associations. Its iD is  “a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.”

Specifically related to grant submission, ORCID integrates with SciENcv to make creating NIH and NSF biosketches easier. In addition, NIH will soon begin requiring ORCID iDs for anyone supported by NIH research training, fellowship, research education, and career development awards.

Signing up for you own ORCID identifier is easy — registration takes 30 seconds. Once you’re registered you can add professional information to your ORCID record.


Written by Heather Beattey Johnston, Associate Director of Research Communications, Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship, Miami University.

Egg identification Image by Mabel Amber, still incognito via Pixabay.

Fingerprint overprinted with 1's and 0's

ORCID identifiers help researchers distinguish themselves

Screen shot of ORCID homepage. Text: ORCID. Connecting Research and Researchers. (Tabs:) For Researchers, For Organizations, About, Help, Sign In. (Main text:) Distinguish yourself in three easy steps. ORCID provides persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized. Find out more. 1. Register. Get your unique ORCID identifier Register now! Registration takes 30 seconds. 2. Add your info. Enhance your ORCID record with your professional information and link to your other identifiers (such as Scopus or ResearcherID or LinkedIn). 3. Use your ORCID ID. Include your ORCID identifier on your Webpage, when you submit publications, apply for grants, and in any research workflow to ensure you get credit for your work. Members make ORCID Possible! ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by a global community of organizational members, including research organizations, publishers, funders, professional associations, and other stakeholders in the research ecosystem. Curious about who our members are? See our complete list of member organizations. (Sidebar:) Latest News. Fri, 2016-09-23 Peer Review Week - The Video! Thu, 2016-09-22. #RecognitionReview with ORCID. Tue, 2016-0-20 Recognition for Review: Who's Doing What? Mon, 2016-09-12. Meet the Lens: Integrating ORCID IDs into patents. Mon, 2016-08-29. PIDapalooza - What, Why, When, Who? More news.
ORCID is an organization that assigns researchers unique identifiers.

You may recall the hubbub last spring surrounding a paper on fruit-fly genomics that had 1000 authors. Shortly following that, a paper on the Higgs boson published in Physical Review Letters boasted a record-breaking 5,154 authors. That one included 23 authors with the last name Wang, two each with the first initials C, F, H, and Q, and four with the first initial J.

What these examples of “hyperauthorship” make clear is that there can be multiple researchers with similar, if not identical, names in the same field. That can make things difficult for researchers, funders, and publishers alike.

To help resolve this issue, a number of organizations have begun issuing unique identifiers researchers can use to distinguish themselves from others with the same or similar names, thereby protecting their scholarly identities.

One of the most popular of these organizations is ORCID. ORCID “provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.” Specifically related to grant submission, ORCID integrates with SciENcv to make creating NIH bioskteches easier.

Signing up for you own ORCID identifier is easy — registration takes 30 seconds. Once you’re registered you can add professional information to your ORCID record.

ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by research organizations, publishers, funders, and professional associations.


Digital identity image via PublicDomainPictures.net, in public domain.