Illustration of a computer with a virtual meeting on the screen.

Office of Research for Undergraduates to host fall events virtually

This fall, the Office of Research for Undergraduates is hosting two different virtual panels and a series of virtual Q & A sessions.

Faculty Panel: Research in the Virtual World

How has research been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic? Are students still able to work in labs and on research projects? Join us as Miami faculty share their experiences conducting research in the virtual world.

To volunteer as a panelist, contact the ORU.

To attend, register for either session by clicking a date and time below.

Faculty & Student Panel: Disciplinary Approaches to Research

Curious about the research being conducted in your major? This panel series will explore research questions and approaches across disciplines from both the faculty and student perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to ask questions about ongoing research.

To volunteer as a panelist, contact the ORU.

To attend, register for a session by clicking one of the dates and time below.

Q & A sessions with the Office of Research for Undergraduates

Martha Weber and Joyce Fernandes will be available to answer your questions on upcoming programming for undergraduate research. Some events feature guest speakers.

To attend, register for a session by clicking one of the dates and times below.


Image by Alexandra_Koch via Pixabay, used under Creative Commons license.

Illustration communicating ideas and connections

TVSF applications being accepted through July

A man wearing a business suit touches a drawing of an illuminated lightbulb.Applications are being accepted for the University of Dayton-Miami University Technology Validation and Startup Fund (TVSF) on a rolling basis through July 2019.

Funded by a $200,000 grant awarded by the Ohio Third Frontier Commission and $200,000 in matching funds supplied by the two universities, the UD-Miami TVSF supports commercialization of technology developed at either institution. Commercialization can be accomplished either through collaborations with existing Ohio companies or through the creation of new start-ups in the state.

“The TVSF will allow both universities to stimulate more innovation and — more importantly — transfer the knowledge generated at each university to the Ohio community,” says Matt Willenbrink, University of Dayton’s Director of Technology Partnerships.

“This is an important step in furthering president Greg Crawford’s agenda to grow Miami University’s reputation for innovation and commercialization,” says David Taffet, Miami University Executive in Residence for Inclusive Innovation and Commercialization. “The matching funds Miami and Dayton have invested in this program signify the universities’ joint commitment to innovate at the speed of business.”

For more information, including guidelines and instructions for submission, visit the UD-Miami TVSF website. Questions about the program can be directed to Willenbrink, Taffet, or Miami University Associate Provost for Research, Jim Oris.


Ideas image by Geralt via Pixabay. Lightbulb image via Maxpixel, public domain.

Illustration communicating ideas and connections

TVSF now accepting applications

A man wearing a business suit touches a drawing of an illuminated lightbulb.Applications are now being accepted for the University of Dayton-Miami University Technology Validation and Startup Fund (TVSF). Funded by a $200,000 grant awarded by the Ohio Third Frontier Commission and $200,000 in matching funds supplied by the two universities, the UD-Miami TVSF supports commercialization of technology developed at either institution. Commercialization can be accomplished either through collaborations with existing Ohio companies or through the creation of new start-ups in the state.

“The TVSF will allow both universities to stimulate more innovation and — more importantly — transfer the knowledge generated at each university to the Ohio community,” says Matt Willenbrink, University of Dayton’s Director of Technology Partnerships.

“This is an important step in furthering president Greg Crawford’s agenda to grow Miami University’s reputation for innovation and commercialization,” says David Taffet, Miami University Executive in Residence for Inclusive Innovation and Commercialization. “The matching funds Miami and Dayton have invested in this program signify the universities’ joint commitment to innovate at the speed of business.”

For more information, including guidelines and instructions for submission, visit the UD-Miami TVSF website. Questions about the program can be directed to Willenbrink, Taffet, or Miami University Associate Provost for Research, Jim Oris.


Ideas image by Geralt via Pixabay. Lightbulb image via Maxpixel, public domain.

Umbrellas of various colors float in front of a few fluffy clouds and blue sky.

Internal diversity and inclusion grant recipients share project updates

Hearts of different colors are layered on top of each other to form a sort of rainbow. The rainbow is superimposed over silhouettes of various people.

In Spring 2017, the Office of the President and OARS issued a special call for proposals to conduct research, scholarship, or creative activities in the areas of social justice, human rights, diversity, and inclusion. Eight projects were ultimately awarded funding. A previous post listed the projects that were funded and the PIs who are leading them.

Late in the fall, representatives from the project teams gathered to share details about their projects and updates on their progress. This post summarizes those details.

Note: Team members whose names appear in italics were present at the meeting.


Inclusion of a Miami Undergraduate Student with Autism in Autism Research

Aaron Shield, assistant professor, Speech Pathology & Audiology

According to Shield, many within the autism community are pushing back against a worldview that labels autism as a pathology. They find much of the current narrative about autism to be stigmatizing and exclusionary.

Shield feels that including people with autism in research on autism could help change that narrative, so he has hired a student with autism as a research assistant.

“This student will give me an insider perspective on autism that I don’t have,” Shield says. “He also has academic strengths in areas that are not my forté, so I hope working with him will be mutually beneficial.”

Although Shield imagines this project leading to published papers, he says he isn’t sure yet about specific scholarly outlets. In any case, he says he hopes to include his new research assistant as a co-author.


Strategies for Healing from Racial Battle Fatigue

Stephen Quaye, associate professor, Educational Leadership

Racial battle fatigue – the cumulative experience people of color have in being continually exposed to racial micro-aggressions and racism – has negative consequences for health and well-being. Quaye is interested in looking at how student affairs educators cope with racial battle fatigue.

“I want to understand what black student affairs educators do when they’re experiencing racial battle fatigue,” Quaye says. “What are the strategies they use to navigate that? Ultimately, how do they work to heal from that so that they are able to devote more of their time towards those creative activities and ventures that are productive and positive?”

Quaye has been overwhelmed by the response to a call he put out on social media asking student affairs professionals to share their experiences with racial battle fatigue. Within hours, he says he had been contacted by 125 people. Because qualitative data collection is labor-intensive, Quaye says he decided to interview 35 of the respondents in what he is now thinking of as Phase I of his project.

Although he has not completed analysis of his data, Quaye says one finding has already stood out for him. “It’s really important for people of color that when they label what they have experienced as racism, people validate that as real, rather than minimizing or dismissing it,” he says. “Having their feelings dismissed only further perpetuates the experience.”

In addition to publishing in scholarly outlets, Quaye hopes to organize a workshop for people within and outside the Miami community. His goal is to support people of color by connecting them with others who are also navigating racial battle fatigue so that they can work together to develop and implement effective coping strategies.


Developing and Evaluating an Interdisciplinary Curriculum Focused on Social Justice in Pre-Service Teacher Education

Scott Sander, clinical faculty, Teacher Education; Andrew Saultz, assistant professor, educational leadership; Brittany Aronson, assistant professor, Educational Leadership; Ashley Cartell Johnson, clinical faculty, Educational Psychology; Molly Kelly, senior clinical faculty, Educational Psychology; Rachel Radina, visiting assistant professor, Teacher Education; and Ganiva Reyes, assistant professor, Teacher Education

Sander, Saultz, Aronson, Johnson, Kelly, Radina, and Reyes are working to develop a model for centering social justice in teacher education programs that will develop the critical consciousness of graduates.

“Teacher ed is not usually centered on conversations about social justice, diversity, and inclusion,” Sander says. “It is something that’s new. It’s not how I was trained when I was a student at Miami. So how am I now teaching differently?”

In a sort of ad hoc faculty learning community, the group has been co-teaching and reflecting on themselves and the work they do.

“We’ve been thinking about how our different perspectives can inform one another to enable students to develop a more complicated and in-depth understanding of social justice,” Reyes says.

Students enrolled in the team members’ classes were asked to complete a survey at the beginning and then again at the end of fall semester so the team could evaluate the impact of various methods employed during the term. Beyond the quantifiable effects on students, however, Reyes says the project has been valuable in connecting people across departments within the College of Education, Health, and Society who are doing similar work and helping them feel less isolated and more supported.

In addition to publications, the team hopes to produce professional development resources to help other Miami educators advance social justice through their work.


Improving a Positive Youth Development Program for African American and Latina Adolescent Girls: A Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention

Erin Harper, assistant professor, Educational Psychology; Anthony James, assistant professor, Family Science & Social Work; and Chamina Smith, lecturer, Commerce

This project centers on a community-based, positive youth development program for African American and Latina girls at the Booker Washington Community Center in Hamilton, Ohio. Chamina Smith and Evelyn Moore created the program in 2013. Harper, Smith, and Moore, along with Miami University students, serve as mentors in the inter- and intragenerational mentoring program, where they are currently helping participants develop a multicultural community fair to be held in May.

Together with James, Harper and Smith are collecting data on outcomes and values from program participants and their families. They’re looking at what values these young women and their families hold around academic success, community involvement, cultural competency, life skills, positive life choices, positive core values, and sense of self. They also want to learn about how participants and their families define positive outcomes in those domains. In addition, the team is collecting data on the process of creating the community fair, with the goal of evaluating its effectiveness as a participatory, culture-specific intervention.

“We want to look at outcomes and understand how the youth and their families feel about the program and what value they feel they’re getting from it,” Harper says.

The team is currently mapping out a plan to publish their findings.


A Culturally-Sensitive Investigation of Bisexual Women’s Increased Risk of Sexual Victimization

Amy McConnell, graduate student, Psychology; Julia Kaufman, graduate student, Psychology; Prachi Bhuptani, graduate student, Psychology; and Terri Messman-Moore, professor, Psychology

Under the guidance of faculty advisor Messman-Moore, PI McConnell and her team are working to better understand how bisexual women perceive sexual violence in their community. The team was simultaneously gratified and dismayed at the strong response to the recruitment fliers they posted on campus. Within two hours of the fliers going up, Messman-Moore says they received 40 email inquiries.

“Certainly, it was affirming for us that we had tapped into something that was important,” McConnell says. “But we were also horrified to see the numbers and to know the implications of that immediate desire to participate.”

The team wrapped up the first phase of their project in the fall semester, conducting six focus groups and analyzing the associated data. Messman-Moore says the Phase I study will likely be written up for publication. McConnell says Phase I will also inform the development of a larger quantitative study that seeks to identify risk factors for victimization among bisexual women. McConnell envisions that second phase of the project being her dissertation research.


A Cross-Cultural Study of Mental Health Stigma and Help-Seeking

Sarah Dreyer-Oren, graduate student, Psychology; Anjali Jain, graduate student, Psychology; Tessa Benson-Greenwald, graduate student, Psychology; Tasse Hammond, senior biology and psychology major; and Elise Clerkin, assistant professor, Psychology

This team is looking at how culture affects individuals’ propensity for seeking help for mental health issues. Specifically, they’re interested differences between cultures that emphasize group well-being differ and cultures that emphasize individual well-being with regard to:

  • Stigmas around mental health issues
  • The makeup of individuals’ social support networks
  • The role stigmas and social support networks play in influencing help-seeking behaviors

To assess these differences, the team is administering surveys to Miami’s domestic and Chinese international students. Cross-cultural and cross-linguistic considerations have made this process slow.

“A lot of our measures are developed by native English speakers and validated in Wester cultures,” Benson-Greenwald says. “So, we hired a team of bilingual translators to translate English measure into Chinese and then back into English. Someone has to take the time to see if there is equivalence in concepts across cultures.”

Benson-Greenwald and the rest of the team will run a pilot study to validate the newly translated measures before launching a full longitudinal study. Ultimately, they hope the data they collect will inform the development of programs that reduce the perception of mental health stigmas among international students and that help those students feel more comfortable seeking help for mental health issues. The team also envisions determining which treatment options are most effective for students of various cultures.


Because of a conflict with planned conference attendance, representatives from two projects were unable to attend the fall meeting.

No special call was issued in 2017-2018. Instead, three programs — Undergraduate Research Awards (URA), Doctoral-Undergraduate Opportunity Scholarships (DUOS), and Committee on Faculty Research (CFR) Faculty Research Grants — gave special consideration to proposals that included research, scholarship, or creative activities in in the areas of social justice, human rights, diversity, and inclusion. A list of 2017-2018 CFR Faculty Research Grants recipients can be found here.


Written by Heather Beattey Johnston, Associate Director of Research Communications, Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship, Miami University.

Umbrella image by Geralt; rainbow image by GDJ, both via Pixabay and used under Creative Commons license.

Abstract illustration of four faces, showing diversity in colors, features, and so on.

Recipients of internal grants in social justice, human rights, diversity, and inclusion announced

Illustration of hands of various colors and sizes raised as though volunteering.

This past spring, as part of broader university-wide diversity and inclusion efforts, Miami University’s Office of the President and the Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship (OARS) issued a special call for proposals to conduct research, scholarship, or creative activities in the areas of social justice, human rights, diversity, and inclusion. Below is a list of projects that have been awarded funding through this initiative.

  • “Support for Disability Assistance? Deservingness, Group Affect, and American Public Opinion,” Monica Schneider (Political Science) and Rachel Blum (Political Science) – $5,000
  • “Inclusion of a Miami Undergraduate Student with Autism in Autism Research,” Aaron Shield (Speech Pathology & Audiology) – $4,300
  • “Strategies for Healing from Racial Battle Fatigue,” Stephen Quaye (Educational Leadership) – $5,000
  • “Elect Her? Evaluation of a College Training Program,” Monica Schneider (Political Science) and Colleen Bunn (Office of Residence Life) – $4,400
  • “Developing and Evaluating an Interdisciplinary Curriculum Focused on Social Justice in Pre-Service Teacher Education,” Scott Sander (Teacher Education), Andrew Saultz (Educational Leadership), Brittany Aronson (Educational Leadership), Ashley Cartell Johnson (Educational Psychology), Molly Kelly (Educational Psychology), Rachel Radina (Teacher Education), and Ganiva Reyes (Teacher Education) – $15,000
  • “Improving a Positive Youth Development Program for African American and Latina Adolescent Girls: A Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention,” Erin Harper (Educational Psychology), Anthony James (Family Science & Social Work), Chamina Smith (Commerce) – $15,000
  • “A Culturally-Sensitive Investigation of Bisexual Women’s Increased Risk of Sexual Victimization,” graduate students Amy McConnell, Julia Kaufman, and Prachi Bhuptani, under the direction of Terri Messman-Moore (Psychology) – $2,500
  • “A Cross-Cultural Study of Mental Health Stigma and Help-Seeking,” graduate students Sarah Dreyer-Oren, Anjali Jain, and Tessa Benson-Greenwald and undergraduate student Tassee Hammond, under the direction of Elise Clerkin (Psychology) – $7,500

In the 2017-2018 round of applications for the University Research Awards (URA), Doctoral-Undergraduate Opportunity Scholarship (DUOS), and Committee on Faculty Research (CFR) Faculty Research Grants programs, special consideration will be given to proposals that include research, scholarship, or creative activities in the areas of social justice, human rights, diversity, and inclusion. Look for more information as program announcements are released in the coming months.


Abstract face image by Dawn Hudson via PublicDomainPictures.net, in the public domain. Hand image by Kaitlyn via clker.com, used under Creative Commons license.

A woman presents her research to an audience at the Miami University Graduate Research Forum. On the screen behind her is a partial map of north Africa and the Middle East, with the title "Arab Spring."

OARS, Office of the President announce new internal funding opportunity

An African-American teacher works with two African-American students in a classroom.

As part of broader university-wide diversity and inclusion efforts, Miami University’s Office of the President and the Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship (OARS) are issuing a special call for proposals to conduct research, scholarship, or creative activities in the areas of social justice, human rights, diversity, and inclusion. Proposals may be submitted in any of these areas, but must address a scholarly question that will lead to testable objectives or measurable outcomes.

Full-time, tenure-eligible faculty and faculty-mentored undergraduate and graduate students in good standing are eligible for funding. Individual faculty may request up to $5,000, and faculty-mentored students may request up to $2,500 in professional expense funds to conduct the proposed project. Interdisciplinary teams of three or more faculty or faculty-mentored students may request up to $15,000 (faculty) or $7,500 (students).

Project periods should cover one or two academic semesters, excluding Winter Term. Higher levels of consideration will be given to proposals that show evidence of outcomes that will lead to scholarly presentations, publications, performances, or exhibitions and/or to the submission of grant proposals to external funding agencies or foundations.

Guidelines for proposal preparation are available on the OARS website here. Applications may be submitted online here.

The deadline for submission is April 7, 2017. Announcement of awards will be made by April 28 and funding will be available after June 1, 2017.

Questions about the program may be directed to Associate Vice President Ron Scott or Associate Provost Jim Oris.


Photos by Miami University Communications and Marketing.

A spring view of Upham Hall on the Oxford, Ohio, campus of Miami University

Late student’s legacy helps Miami undergrads achieve their research goals

A bonobo squats on a log. The primate rests its hands and one foot on a wood post in front of its body. Green foliage is visible in the background.
Miami University junior Jordan Martin, recipient of a 2015 award from the Rebecca Jeanne Andrew Memorial Award program, studies bonobos like the one pictured here.

This June, Miami University junior Jordan Martin will present his personality research on bonobos at the American Society of Primatologists’ annual meeting. He studied the endangered great apes at the Cincinnati Zoo last year.

The 21-year-old student will continue his research at the Columbus Zoo this summer, thanks to a $5,700 award from the Rebecca Jeanne Andrew Memorial Award program. He was awarded $2,500 last year.

This April marks the 20th anniversary of the fund that Rebecca’s family, friends and classmates established through the Miami University Foundation in her memory.

She and another student, Christopher Eggerton, 21, died on Nov. 19, 1995, in the French Alps after a group of students on a break from studies at Miami’s Luxembourg campus became stranded on a ski slope during a storm.

Rebecca, a junior majoring in anthropology, wanted to make a career in primatology, the scientific study of primates.

The awards are made on or near her April 14 birthday every year. And every year for the past 20 years, her parents, Jeff and Melanie Andrew, have made the drive from their home in Bath, in northeast Ohio, to Miami’s Oxford campus for the presentation.

“It’s always bittersweet,” Jeff Andrew said.

“It’s also very warm and rewarding,” Melanie Andrew added. “It feels good to both of us to see these students do such wonderful things with the award that they are presented. We love hearing about their projects.”

On Tuesday — what would have been Rebecca’s 40th birthday — they gathered again in Upham Hall to celebrate what Linda Marchant, professor of anthropology and director of the university honors program, called “a tremendous legacy.”

Forty five “Rebecca awards” totaling $64,391 have supported undergraduate students interested in primatology or biological anthropology conduct research. A three-member faculty committee and Rebecca’s parents review the proposals. Awards have sent recipients to study primates in England, Ecuador, Kenya, Senegal, Uganda, Madagascar, Thailand, Nepal, Costa Rica and multiple sites in the United States.

Ten recipients have gone on to earn their doctorate degrees, Marchant noted.

Mark Allen Peterson, chair of anthropology and professor of anthropology and international studies, said the Rebecca Jeanne Andrew Memorial Award program’s impact is noteworthy.

“This program has had significant impact on a large number of students with anthropology, biology or zoology degrees whose successful research projects, funded by the award, have gotten them into prestigious graduate schools,” Peterson said. “Many professional primatologists now working at universities, zoos and research centers got their start at Miami through this award.”

Martin — a psychology and biology double major with minors in anthropology and neuroscience — plans to pursue graduate studies in psychology or evolutionary anthropology after he graduates from Miami in 2016. He would like to continue studying the social and personality psychology of humans and bonobos.

“The award has allowed me to achieve more than I ever thought possible as an undergraduate student,” Martin said. “During the course of my research, I have fallen in love with bonobos and plan to dedicate my life to ensuring their biological success as an endangered species as well as their psychological well-being in captivity.”

Rebecca Andrew had a similar passion for primates.

Marchant fondly remembers her as bright, ambitious and funny, with boundless energy, a love of nature and a deep commitment to conservation. “She was everything you look for in a student,” she said.

A picture of Rebecca, a gift from her parents, still hangs in Marchant’s research laboratory, along with another one of Rebecca with her friend Melanie Peterson, who joined Jennifer Weghorst as being the first “Rebecca award” recipients in 1996.

The pictures are there to honor her memory but also to put a face to Rebecca for students who will never know her but quickly become familiar with her lasting legacy through the program that may one day help them achieve research goals of their own.

Written by Margo Kissell, Miami University News & Communications. Originally appeared as a “Top Story” on Miami University’s News and Events website.

Bonobo photo by Natataek at English Wikivoyage via Wikimedia Commons, used under Creative Commons license.

An illustration of recursive cycles. Blue lines -- some solid, some dotted -- form circles on a charcoal grey background. There are arrows and open circles at intervals along the lines. At the top of each circle, a line extends beyond the circle to create a new half circle that connects to the next full circle.

Provost’s office announces recipients of Innovation & Interdisciplinary funding awards

Line drawings of compact fluorescent lightbulbs on brown paper. The lightbulbs are arranged at an angle to the bottom of the frame, and they are arranged in rows. In each row, the orientation of the lightbulbs alternates, so that the part that lights up extends toward the top of the frame in one row, and toward the bottom in the next. One bulb in the center is colored white, so that it appears to be lit up.

Last week, the Provost’s office announced which projects have been selected for Innovation & Interdisciplinary funding.  Congratulations to the following teams.


Community Place-Based Interdisciplinary Program

Tammy Schwartz, Urban Teaching Cohort Program
Thomas Dutton, Center for Community Engagement in Over-the-Rhine
Monica Ways, Office of Community Engagement and Service
Lee Harrington, Sociology & Gerontology
Walter Vanderbush, Latin American, Latino/a, & Caribbean Studies

Drawing from the lessons learned in the Urban Teaching Cohort three-year community-based curriculum model, the project aims to encourage other academic programs to develop urban community-based pedagogies and practices relevant to their disciplines.  Its goals are to generate new courses and team-teaching across departments, create teaching teams composed of Miami faculty and community-based professionals, build multi-year curricular paths, and strengthen community partnerships.  $115,000


Dream Keepers: A Grow-Your-Own Initiative

Denise Taliaferro-Baszile, Educational Leadership
Gwendolyn Etter-Lewis, English

The goal of this project is to implement a three-year college readiness program targeted at high-achieving multicultural students in urban school districts in the greater Cincinnati area.  Miami faculty and undergraduate students will collaborate with local community educators to engage teams of high school students in after-school workshops and summer experiences aimed at enhancing cognitive strategies, self-management, and college knowledge.  $150,000


 Expanding the First-Year Research Experience (FYRE) Program

Joseph Johnson, Psychology and Office of Research for Undergraduates

The goal of this project is to revise and expand the existing First-Year Research Program to serve 300-400 students across a wider range of degree programs.  The revised program features a multi-year curriculum and organizes students into research teams guided by peer mentors and graduate assistants who are supervised by faculty members.  $100,000


Miami University Food Studies Institute

Peggy Shaffer, History and American Studies
Alfredo Huerta, Biology
Thomas Crist, Institute for Environmental Studies
Sheila Croucher, American Studies
Amelie Davis, Geography
Ann Fuehrer, Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies
John Keegan, Biology
Neringa Klumbyte, Anthropology
Anita Mannur, Asian & Asian American Studies, English, and Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies
Beth Miller, Kinesiology & Health
Jason Palmeri, English
Nancy Parkinson, Kinesiology & Health
Charles Stevens, International Studies Program

The goals of this project are to:

  • Coordinate and develop interdisciplinary curricula centered on food;
  • Support interdisciplinary research and grant development focused on food-related issues;
  • House an experiential learning center that features a multifunctional organic garden and sustainable composting facility.

$200,000


Global Health Research Innovation Center

Cameron Hay-Rollins, Anthropology

The goals of this project are to:

  • Establish research partnerships with domestic and international organizations;
  • Design interdisciplinary projects and write research grants to support them;
  • Conduct the research, and publicize findings, thereby raising the profile of global health at Miami University.

$120,000


Miami University Center for Analytics & Data Science

John Bailer, Statistics
Allison Jones-Farmer, Information Systems & Analytics
Skip Benamati, Information Systems & Analytics
Robert Dahlstrom, Marketing
James Kiper, Computer Science & Software Engineering
Gillian Oakenfull, Marketing

The goals of this project are to:

  • Develop interdisciplinary academic programs that directly address high demand skills;
  • Partner with internal and external organizations to develop experiential learning opportunities;
  • Foster interdisciplinary collaborative research;
  • Provide professional development for Miami students, faculty, and staff in data science skills.

$175,000


Miami University Agile Initiative

Jerry Gannod, Computer Science & Software Engineering
Douglas Havelka, Information Systems & Analytics
Timothy Krehbiel, Management
Eric Luczaj, Computer & Information Technology

The goal of this project is to establish Miami as a leader in using Agile in higher education and helping other institutions to adopt Agile by creating workshops designed to expand Miami faculty’s knowledge of Agile and producing graduates who use Agile for learning, discovery, reflection, and innovation throughout their careers.  In addition, the project proposers plan to develop and offer fee-based professional education in Agile as a means of sustaining the initiative over time.  $120,000


NOTE: Award amounts listed represent total recommended funding for the full three-year project period.  In practice, after first-year awards are made, funding in the second and third years will be contingent on meeting first-year outcomes and continuing progress.

Illustrations by Libby Levi for opensource.com, via Flickr.  Used under Creative Commons license.