Alicia Knoedler named Miami’s Vice President for Research & Innovation

Alicia Knoedler

Alicia Knoedler will become Miami University’s vice president for research and innovation (VPRI) on Nov. 1.

She is the former executive associate vice president for research and executive director of the Center for Research Program Development and Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma.

Knoedler will replace Michael Crowder, associate provost and dean of the Graduate School, who is leading the Office of Research and Innovation on an interim basis.

Jason Osborne, Miami’s provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said Knoedler specializes in crafting, leading and implementing initiatives of strategic value to research across all disciplines and a diverse range of research organizations.

“Dr. Knoedler is a national leader in developing university-based research enterprises and talent. She has had substantial success in helping individuals craft career-long scholarship trajectories, has a strong record of supporting underserved disciplines like the arts and humanities, and has led efforts to diversify research leadership nationally,” Osborne said. “I believe she will quickly empower our faculty, staff and students toward more competitive, successful and impactful research programs, fellowships and awards.”

Prior to her positions at the University of Oklahoma, she served to develop and grow research capacity within various roles at Pennsylvania State University and the University of Notre Dame.

Knoedler wrote in her cover letter for the position that she has cultivated and leveraged nontraditional opportunities in developing her approach to research leadership. She recently served as the director of team innovation within Exaptive, Inc.

“What appeals to me about the VPRI position at Miami University are the needs for a holistic approach to strategically advance research/scholarship/creative activity, innovate in areas of research support and operations, embolden researchers at all levels to pursue research challenges of significant relevance and value across a variety of contexts and stakeholders, and assist in the production of and advocacy for collective research outcomes,” she wrote.

Knoedler earned a bachelor’s degree psychology from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas and a master’s and doctorate in cognitive psychology from Purdue University. Her research interests focus on various memory processes and optimal conditions for remembering as well as dynamic team behaviors and the contributions of team translators as catalysts within research teams.

Osborne noted that over the course of her career, Knoedler has developed a number of programs in support of the development and expansion of research, scholarship and creative activity.

She co-led Oklahoma’s statewide collaborative EPSCoR Track 1 Research Infrastructure Improvement Award, funded by the National Science Foundation, which focused on the socio-ecological approaches to studying climate variability in Oklahoma.

Knoedler also served on the Oklahoma Governor’s Science and Technology Council, which reports to the Oklahoma secretary for science and technology.

In service and leadership to research development at the national level, Knoedler is a founding member, former member of the board of directors and was president and immediate past-president of the National Organization of Research Development Professionals (NORDP). She was recently named one of 13 NORDP inaugural fellows.

Knoedler has collaborated with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities’ (APLU) Council on Research to develop and lead training, professional development and leadership opportunities for senior research leaders and those aspiring to such positions.

She is a member of the National Science Foundation (NSF)’s business and operations advisory committee and vice chair of the NSF-wide committee on equal opportunities in science and engineering, drawing a connection between the NSF’s commitment to broadening participation and the commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging from audiences, institutions and organizations across the nation.


Originally appeared as a “Top Story” on Miami University’s News & Events website.

A hanging file folder labeled "Changes" sits atop a computer keyboard.

Roles and department assignments for RSP staff changing

The addition of CaTia Daniels to the Research & Sponsored Programs (RSP) staff has given us the opportunity to make some improvements to the proposal services we provide, and to update the list of RSP Consultants assigned to each department.

CaTia will now be the primary RSP consultant for the following departments:

  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Computer Science and Software Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Statistics
  • College of Education, Health and Society (except Kinesiology, Nutrition, and Health)

All other department assignments remain unchanged.  As always, any of the three RSP consultants — Anne Schauer, Amy Cooper, and CaTia Daniels — can assist any faculty with proposal submission in the absence of the primary department consultant.

We have also expanded Vanessa Gordon’s role in the proposal preparation process. Vanessa will now serve as the “RSP Cayuse Expert” and will be the go-to person for all Cayuse questions. Among her new duties, Vanessa will now be available to provide the following services upon request:

  • Start a Cayuse proposal record: Email Vanessa the following information:
    • Sponsor
    • Prime funding agency (only if we are a subcontractor)
    • Sponsor program name (if applicable)
    • Proposal guidelines URL
    • Project title
    • Project dates
    • Proposal deadline
    • Name(s) of subcontractors (if applicable)
    • Names of co-PIs (if applicable) and % allocation for each (total should be 100%)
  • Add new sponsors: Email Vanessa if your proposal sponsor or one of your subcontractors is not currently in the Cayuse system.
  • Enter detailed budget in Cayuse SP, Cayuse 424, and Fastlane: Email Vanessa your final approved internal budget spreadsheet.
  • Review and approve Cayuse SP record before it is submitted for routing: Email Vanessa once your record is complete and she will review, approve, and submit for routing on your behalf.

Image by Nick Youngson, Alpha Stock Images, used under Creative Commons license.

Boy waving goodbye.

Out with the OARS and in with the new

Neon sign reads "NEW"

As previously announced, the Office for the Advancement of Research & Scholarship is no more. We are currently in the process of updating our communications channels to reflect our new name: the Office of Research & Innovation.

In fact, you may have noticed some changes here in this very blog. The blog is now known as the Research & Innovation Report and it has a new URL: MiamiOHResearch.org. If you’re a subscriber, you don’t need to do anything to keep seeing posts in your inbox. And if you’ve bookmarked us, no need to worry about updating the link because the old URL redirects to the new one. But, if you tell anyone about us — and we hope you will! — it would probably be good to send them to the new URL.  (And a heads-up that we will be redesigning the blog, so look for a fresh new appearance in the coming weeks.)

We’ve also updated our Twitter handle and created a new Facebook page.

If you already follow us on Twitter, thank you; there’s no need to do anything to keep seeing our tweets in your feed. You’ll just see they come from MiamiOH_ResInno, rather than MiamiOH_OARS. If you don’t already follow us but want to, or if you need to update a bookmark or want to invite a friend to follow us, you can find us at twitter.com/MiamiOH_ResInno.

Whether you followed OARS’ old Facebook page (which will no longer be supported) or would like to connect with us for the first time, we encourage you to like our new page at facebook.com/MiamiOH.ResearchInnovation.

We look forward to seeing you around!


Neon sign image by mstlion via Pixabay. Wave goodbye image by mohamed_hassan via Pixabay. Both used under Creative Commons license.