Sketch of the letters X, Y, and Z

Using SciENcv to create compliant biosketches

SciENcv biosketches will be required for NSF proposals with submission deadlines on and after October 5, 2020. With that date coming up quickly, we want to give all of the faculty at Miami a heads-up about creating their biosketches on SciENcv. Please follow the directions below.

  • Click the NSF login button to connect SciENcv with your profile on research.gov.
  • You will be redirected to research.gov’s sign-in page. Enter your login information and click the Sign In button.
  • After you log in, you will be redirected back to the NCBI website, where you will now be logged in. Click the Create New Document link.
  • Once on the “Create a New Document” page you will need to name your bio-sketch. We highly recommend naming it with a date so you know when updates will be needed in the future. In the format section, select NSF Biosketch.
    • Select an option in the “Choose data source” section.

      • If you select National Science Foundation from the “External source” drop-down menu and you have nothing in your NSF profile, you will see a message warning you that some SciENcv fields will be left blank.
      • If you select Start with a blank document and then click Create, you will be taken to a page where you can input your professional preparation, appointments, products, and synergistic activities.
        • Under “C. PRODUCTS,” clicking the Select citations link will allow you either to connect your ORCID account or to visit “My Bibliography,” where you can select citations to add to your ScieENcv.

 

        • If you do not have existing citations uploaded to NSF or ORCID, you will need to add them in SciENcv individually, but you will only need to do this once because the system will save the information and auto-populate it in future bio-sketches. Clicking the add citations link in the “Products” section allows you to access PubMed citations.
  • Once you have completed your bio-sketch, click Download: PDF in the bottom right of the page, below “Synergistic Activities.” Select PDF download your biosketch in the format shown below.

If you need more help creating a biosketch in SciENcv, please contact me (danielct@MiamiOH.edu) or the proposal consultant assigned to your department!


Public domain image from Max Pixel.

A crowd of people

New NSF-approved formats for biosketch, current and pending support required beginning June 1

The newest National Science Foundation (NSF) Proposal & Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) takes effect June 1, 2020. The most significant changes involve NSF-approved formats for the Biographical Sketch and Current and Pending Support sections, both of which will now have to be in NSF-approved file formats: either SciENcv or NSF fillable-form PDF.

SciENcv integrates with ORCID so that biographical sketch information can be imported directly from ORCID, eliminating some manual entry of information in multiple places. The NSF fillable forms do not integrate with ORCID.

NSF requests that principal investigators start using the new formats now (even for proposals that will be submitted before June 1), so that they can identify potential issues. Feedback about the process should be emailed to policy@nsf.gov.

NSF’s Biographical Sketch and Current and Pending Support pages include links to the fillable forms as well as FAQs. Visit the SciENcv site for video tutorials and FAQs.


Image by Clker-Free-Vector-Images via Pixabay, used under Creative Commons license.

A collection of chicken eggs, each stamped with an identifier

ORCID identifiers help researchers distinguish themselves

Screen shot of ORCID homepage. Text: ORCID. Connecting Research and Researchers. (Tabs:) For Researchers, For Organizations, About, Help, Sign In. (Main text:) Distinguish yourself in three easy steps. ORCID provides persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized. Find out more. 1. Register. Get your unique ORCID identifier Register now! Registration takes 30 seconds. 2. Add your info. Enhance your ORCID record with your professional information and link to your other identifiers (such as Scopus or ResearcherID or LinkedIn). 3. Use your ORCID ID. Include your ORCID identifier on your Webpage, when you submit publications, apply for grants, and in any research workflow to ensure you get credit for your work. Members make ORCID Possible! ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by a global community of organizational members, including research organizations, publishers, funders, professional associations, and other stakeholders in the research ecosystem. Curious about who our members are? See our complete list of member organizations. (Sidebar:) Latest News. Fri, 2016-09-23 Peer Review Week - The Video! Thu, 2016-09-22. #RecognitionReview with ORCID. Tue, 2016-0-20 Recognition for Review: Who's Doing What? Mon, 2016-09-12. Meet the Lens: Integrating ORCID IDs into patents. Mon, 2016-08-29. PIDapalooza - What, Why, When, Who? More news.
ORCID is an organization that assigns researchers unique identifiers.

You may recall a 2015 paper on the Higgs boson published in Physical Review Letters that boasted a record-breaking 5,154 authors. Twenty-three of those authors had the last name Wang, two each with the first initials C, F, H, and Q, and four with the first initial J.

What this example of “hyperauthorship” make clear is that there can be multiple researchers with similar, if not identical, names in the same field. That can make things difficult for researchers, funders, and publishers alike.

To help resolve this issue, a number of organizations have begun issuing unique identifiers researchers can use to distinguish themselves from others with the same or similar names, thereby protecting their scholarly identities.

One of the most popular of these organizations is ORCID. ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by research organizations, publishers, funders, and professional associations. Its iD is  “a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.”

Specifically related to grant submission, ORCID integrates with SciENcv to make creating NIH and NSF biosketches easier. In addition, NIH will soon begin requiring ORCID iDs for anyone supported by NIH research training, fellowship, research education, and career development awards.

Signing up for you own ORCID identifier is easy — registration takes 30 seconds. Once you’re registered you can add professional information to your ORCID record.


Written by Heather Beattey Johnston, Associate Director of Research Communications, Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship, Miami University.

Egg identification Image by Mabel Amber, still incognito via Pixabay.

NSF gives more researchers a reason to use SciENcv

A hot topic at the Annual Meeting of the National Council of University Research Administrators (NCURA) in August was the Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv), a new electronic system that helps researchers create and maintain their biosketches. SciENcv was conceptualized by an interagency working group that included the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF), along with several other federal funding agencies.

SciENcv reduces the administrative burden of submitting a proposal by serving as a repository of information on expertise, employment, education, and professional accomplishments. It will be linked with ORCID identifiers and databases, such as PubMed. A biosketch created with SciENcv can be tailored to meet the requirements of various funding agencies without the researcher having to worry about formatting.

According to Jean Feldman, head of NSF’s Policy Office, NSF is working with NIH to use SciENcv as a format for creating an approved biosketch. The next version of NSF’s Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) will require researchers to use an NSF-provided template or SciENcv, both of which include mandatory tags that are recognized by NSF’s online submission system, research.gov. A PDF must be generated from one of these two sources or the biosketch will be rejected by research.gov. (Note that while Miami currently uses Fastlane to submit proposals to NSF, we will eventually be switching to research.gov.)

Actual development of the SciENcv system has been led by NIH’s National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which has many SciENcv resources, including a tutorial, available on their website. As Miami moves to research.gov for NSF submissions and SciENcv becomes more prevalent, OARS will offer training as needed.


Written by Amy Hurley Cooper, Assistant Director of Proposal Development, Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship, Miami University.

Photo of Jean Feldman by NSF.

 

Fingerprint overprinted with 1's and 0's

ORCID identifiers help researchers distinguish themselves

Screen shot of ORCID homepage. Text: ORCID. Connecting Research and Researchers. (Tabs:) For Researchers, For Organizations, About, Help, Sign In. (Main text:) Distinguish yourself in three easy steps. ORCID provides persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized. Find out more. 1. Register. Get your unique ORCID identifier Register now! Registration takes 30 seconds. 2. Add your info. Enhance your ORCID record with your professional information and link to your other identifiers (such as Scopus or ResearcherID or LinkedIn). 3. Use your ORCID ID. Include your ORCID identifier on your Webpage, when you submit publications, apply for grants, and in any research workflow to ensure you get credit for your work. Members make ORCID Possible! ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by a global community of organizational members, including research organizations, publishers, funders, professional associations, and other stakeholders in the research ecosystem. Curious about who our members are? See our complete list of member organizations. (Sidebar:) Latest News. Fri, 2016-09-23 Peer Review Week - The Video! Thu, 2016-09-22. #RecognitionReview with ORCID. Tue, 2016-0-20 Recognition for Review: Who's Doing What? Mon, 2016-09-12. Meet the Lens: Integrating ORCID IDs into patents. Mon, 2016-08-29. PIDapalooza - What, Why, When, Who? More news.
ORCID is an organization that assigns researchers unique identifiers.

You may recall the hubbub last spring surrounding a paper on fruit-fly genomics that had 1000 authors. Shortly following that, a paper on the Higgs boson published in Physical Review Letters boasted a record-breaking 5,154 authors. That one included 23 authors with the last name Wang, two each with the first initials C, F, H, and Q, and four with the first initial J.

What these examples of “hyperauthorship” make clear is that there can be multiple researchers with similar, if not identical, names in the same field. That can make things difficult for researchers, funders, and publishers alike.

To help resolve this issue, a number of organizations have begun issuing unique identifiers researchers can use to distinguish themselves from others with the same or similar names, thereby protecting their scholarly identities.

One of the most popular of these organizations is ORCID. ORCID “provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that your work is recognized.” Specifically related to grant submission, ORCID integrates with SciENcv to make creating NIH bioskteches easier.

Signing up for you own ORCID identifier is easy — registration takes 30 seconds. Once you’re registered you can add professional information to your ORCID record.

ORCID is a non-profit organization supported by research organizations, publishers, funders, and professional associations.


Digital identity image via PublicDomainPictures.net, in public domain.